Ever-Changing Climate of Environmental Rules and Regulations

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), July 13, 2005 | Go to article overview

Ever-Changing Climate of Environmental Rules and Regulations


Byline: Matt Johnson

BEFORE last Thursday's shocking events in London, world attention remained focused on Gleneagles where climate change and poverty topped the working agenda at G8.

Agreements reached there, and the progress they may allow, have been overshadowed by what happened south of the border.

A lot of attention - quite rightly - was paid to climate change issues and the way in which they are altering the environments in which we all live.

It's a fact that at events such as the G8 summit everything weighs in on a very big scale - from Presidential security arrangements to catering for members of this most exclusive of world clubs.

But drill down through the posturing and the politics and a clearer picture of how these big decisions affect smaller concerns emerges.

I think there are parallels with the EU. Legislators there leave themselves open to ridicule when they spend time considering such matters as the curve of our imported bananas. But they also make many more important decisions which have a far more important bearing on our businesses.

And, according to a new report from the UK's Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) they are not alone in their efforts to control the way we go about our work.

According to the FSB research, (www.fsb.org.uk) firms fear yet another red tape overload flowing from a total of nine environmental regulations and regulatory amendments being introduced over the next year. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ever-Changing Climate of Environmental Rules and Regulations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.