Duval: Top State Rate for Murder; Overall Violent Crime Continues to Drop, Police Say. Killings Related to Drug Gangs

By Murphy, Bridget | The Florida Times Union, June 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

Duval: Top State Rate for Murder; Overall Violent Crime Continues to Drop, Police Say. Killings Related to Drug Gangs


Murphy, Bridget, The Florida Times Union


Byline: BRIDGET MURPHY

Duval County leads Florida as the county you're most likely to be murdered in, according to recently published state crime statistics adjusted for population.

However, Jacksonville Sheriff's Office officials said Tuesday that residents shouldn't be alarmed since violent crime as a whole dropped, with the spike in murders largely related to drug gang activity they've targeted since January 2004.

Without taking Duval County's population into account, it still ranks second in Florida for the total number of murders (105), second to Miami-Dade County (218), according to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

The number of murders in Jacksonville rose for the third year in a row last year. There were 92 murders in 2003, 90 in 2002, according to the FDLE.

And the annual number of murders in Jacksonville has increased 40 percent since 1998, going up every year except in 2000 and 2001. Sheriff's Office leaders pointed out, however, that excluding murders, violent crimes dropped in 2004 for the sixth straight year.

With a population of 840,474, this year's numbers in Duval County break down to one in every 8,004 people falling victim to murder. Miami-Dade County, with a population of 2,379,818, racked up a murder for every 10,916 people, an analysis shows.

Jacksonville Undersheriff Frank Mackesy said that since January 2004, police broke up five drug-dealing gangs, clearing two murders and putting people who police suspect are responsible for 17 more murders behind bars. A crimefighting initiative called Operation Showdown, which successfully reduced crime in Springfield and another neighborhoods, now is targeting an area in Northwest Jacksonville, as a way for police to continue combatting violent crimes.

"It wasn't [as if] you're going to go out and walk your dog tonight, [and] you're going to be murdered," Mackesy said of the murder increase.

The often compulsive or random nature of some murders also makes them offenses that police can't do a lot to prevent, he said.

"Domestic violence and drug violence, those are categories we can do something about," the undersheriff added.

Jacksonville police statistician Chuck Alsobrook, said Tuesday that Jacksonville as a city ranked 10th in the total number of violent crimes per capita in Florida, according to the FBI's most recent numbers. That includes murder, rape, robbery and aggravated assault.

He said it's also tricky to make comparisons with other cities because of Jacksonville's size. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Duval: Top State Rate for Murder; Overall Violent Crime Continues to Drop, Police Say. Killings Related to Drug Gangs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.