Introduction

By Rude, Donald W. | Intertexts, Fall 2004 | Go to article overview

Introduction


Rude, Donald W., Intertexts


This issue of Intertexts commemorates "Shakespeare 2001: New Readings of the Page, New Meanings for the Stage," the 34th Annual International Comparative Literature Symposium held at Texas Tech University in January of that year, a conference which I was privileged to chair. Sixty scholars, professors and students alike, gathered on the Texas Tech campus to hear a remarkably diverse program which included papers on William Shakespeare and his contemporaries and dealt with the performance of dramatic texts as well as their interpretation. Selecting materials from the conference for inclusion in this publication was a difficult task in light of the general excellence of the presentations and the eagerness of most of the participants to have their work published in Intertexts. In making my final selection, I attempted to incorporate a wide variety of critical approaches and to use material by younger scholars as well as by the established literary critics who participated in the conference. Additionally I sought papers that treated different plays or groups of plays so as to give this volume interest to a wide range of readers.

Because the conference was the first devoted to Shakespeare in the new century and in the new millennium, I sought to incorporate materials that reflected both the well-established methods of twentieth-century scholarship and the methodologies which promise to continue into the new century. Here, there is a curious circularity of interest, for at the beginning of the last century scholarship largely focused on questions of history and biography. Thus it seems of particular interest that, at a time when Shakespeare's plays are once more being assigned to the Earl of Oxford and his sonnets attributed to Mary Sidney, the Countess of Pembroke, one of the deans of modern Shakespearean criticism, David Bevington, turns his attention to biography and the possible biographical determinants that leant shape to the author's later tragedies and romances as he contemplated retirement to Stratford on Avon. Ruminating perhaps on the death of his son in the late 1590s and his relationship with his own daughters, Shakespeare wrote a series of plays extending from King Lear to The Tempest in which father daughter relationships are crucial.

Other papers employ theoretical approaches to the plays which reflect contemporary cultural studies. Joseph Pequigney, whose Such Is My Love was a pioneering exploration of the homoerotic themes in Shakespeare's sonnets, examines recent readings of Coriolanus and Romeo and Juliet proposed by queer theorists and argues for a moderate assessment of the homoerotic element in the plays that examines Shakespeare's language in the context of the Renaissance rather than that of the twentieth century. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Introduction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.