Fallacies


THE dictionary defines fallacy as follows: 1) orig. deception; 2) aptness to mislead, deceptive or delusive quality (the fallacy of the senses); 3) a false or mistaken idea, opinion, etc., error; 4a) an error in reasoning, flaw or defect in argument; 4b) logic and argument which does not conform to the rules of logic, esp. one that appears to be sound.

Without taking sides, and hopefully without being perceived to be doing so, I write this article in the belief that the present debate on the current political, social, and economic crisis could be brought up to a higher plain of discussion, using the very tools of logic to enlighten the people. After all, democratic principles as enshrined in our Constitution says "Sovereignty resides in the people and all government authority emanates from them." If this is so, then the allegiance and loyalty of all citizens must be to the democratic state, as distinguished from a totalitarian one. Public officials whether they are appointed or are elected by the people, in the exercise of their sovereign will, must be absolutely loyal to the people, to the Constitution, and must obey all the laws of the land. In extreme situations, democracies by their very nature acknowledge the right of the people "Whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it." (American Declaration of Independence) This is commonly known as the superior right of revolution.

Having this in mind, the loyalty of a citizen must necessarily be with the people, especially when there is a conflict between the interests of a public official and the interests of the people. There can be no justification for anyone to complain about the "disloyalty" or "treasonous" act of any public official when that official decides to serve the people first, and incidentally, the appointing authority in pursuance of the mandate of loyalty to the sovereign people. In this sense, this is what Quezon once said, that his loyalty to his party ends where his loyalty to his country begins. …

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Fallacies
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