Associations, Conferences, Discussion Groups/blogs, Journals, Software/tools

Library Technology Reports, July-August 2005 | Go to article overview

Associations, Conferences, Discussion Groups/blogs, Journals, Software/tools


Because most of the innovative digital projects in the humanities "speak" for themselves (once you access them online), the following chapter essentially identifies the various types of digital projects under the appropriate category headings (listed in the title of this chapter) and includes a brief description of each project.

Associations

Association for Computers in the Humanities (ACH) www.ach.org

The international Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) is the major professional organization for people that work in computer-aided research in the humanities, specifically in the analysis and manipulation of text-based materials but also in philosophy, literature and language studies, and history, among others. The group's Web site provides access to the organization's events, subcommittee information, and administrative structure as well as to ACH's conference abstracts, jobs' page, affiliated organizations, and its publications.

Association for Literacy and Linguistic Computing (ALLC) www.kcl.ac.uk/humanities/cch/allc

The Association for Literacy and Linguistic Computing (ALLC) was founded in 1973 to assist the field of computing in the study of literature and language. ALLC's Web portal provides access to the group's administrative structure, education and research information, its publications and reports, conference information, and related organizations.

Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL) www.aclweb.org

The Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL) is an international society for those involved in natural language processing and computation. Access to conference information, publications, an e-print archive, and a software registry are some of the services provided through ACL's Web site.

National Initiative for Networked Cultural Heritage www.ninch.org

The NINCH Guide to Good Practice in the Digital Representation & Management of Cultural Heritage Materials www.nyu.edu/its/humanities/ninchguide

NINCH, or the National Initiative for Networked Cultural Heritage, is a coalition of arts, humanities, and social science organizations created to provide leadership in the digital environment for the cultural community. The NINCH Guide to Good Practice in the Digital Representation & Management of Cultural Heritage Materials is available online, along with information on the group's active role in sponsoring workshops, town meetings, and other activities in relation to NINCH's mission statement.

Text Encoding Initiative www.tei-c.org

Perhaps the defining achievement and, indeed, the driving force behind much of contemporary humanities computing, the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) was one of the first well-defined metadata standards. Its purpose was/is to facilitate the encoding of literary texts for display and research on the Internet. It has evolved from a group of dedicated individuals to a consortium of individual and organizational members, which oversees the maintenance of the standard.

The Modern Language Association www.mla.org

The Modern Language Association Language Map www.mla.org/census main

The Modern Language Association (MLA) is one of the oldest professional organizations in the humanities. MLA's Web site features a very innovative interactive map of the United States, which provides linguistic and cultural composition of the specific US regions. Based on the 2000 census, the Modern Language Association Language Map enables users to zoom in on very specific geographic regions, cities, and places within the United States in order to access, compare, and manipulate data available on language and language groups. The map is also education-based, and it provides resources for both teachers and students to "play" with the information.

Conferences

ACH/ALLC Joint Conference http://web.uvic.ca/hrd/achallc2005

ACH/ALLC: The Joint Conferences www. …

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