Strike Ends at Pittsburgh Press

Monthly Labor Review, February 1993 | Go to article overview

Strike Ends at Pittsburgh Press


The Teamsters' union reached a settlement with the Pittsburgh-Post Gazette, ending a 6-month work stoppage that idled Pittsburgh's two daily newspapers. The settlement eliminated a major hurdle in the sale of the Gazette's city rival, the Pittsburgh Press. The E.W. Scripps Co., owner of the Press, had earlier reached an agreement to sell the newspaper to Blade Communications, Inc., owner of the Gazette, contingent on success by the Gazette in negotiating labor contracts with the Press' unions. The purchase also depended on financing and on approval by the Justice Department, which reviews sales of one newspaper to an other for potential antitrust violations.

The Teamsters struck the Press last May, protesting the planned cut of 450 Teamster jobs. The union represented 627 drivers and circulation workers who delivered the city's two daily newspapers, which were managed under a joint operating agreement for printing and distribution by the Press of both newspapers. The striking Teamsters and members of nine other unions had been working without an agreement since December 31, 1991, when contracts covering 1,250 workers expired.

Officials of the Press said they wanted to save $25 million by streamlining its delivery system, eliminating 450 delivery and 4,500 youth carrier positions and directing the remaining drivers to drop newspapers at about 30 distribution centers for pickup by adult carriers.

The walkout prompted the shutdown of both newspapers. After the strike began, the Press stopped publishing, but reportedly used its editorial staff to put out an alternative, smaller newspaper, the Allegheny Times. The Gazette published a free, two-sided publication that it has distributed at major commuting points in the Pittsburgh area.

When the Press hired temporary workers to replace the strikers, the Teamsters feared that their members would be permanently replaced. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Strike Ends at Pittsburgh Press
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.