Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Dedicated

By DiRosa, Andrew | The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, May 1992 | Go to article overview

Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Dedicated


DiRosa, Andrew, The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin


In Washington, DC, President George Bush culminated a 2-day "National Salute to Law Enforcement" by dedicating the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial. Standing before the 20,000 law enforcement officers, survivors of slain officers, and dignitaries gathered, the President highlighted the contributions of all law enforcement officers and paid special tribute to those Federal, State, and local officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty.

In his remarks, the President told those attending, "We gather here today to dedicate this memorial to uniformed heroes ... who enforce the law and keep us secure here at home. For too long, America's lawmen and women have been the forgotten heroes - forgotten until there is trouble.... Today we remember these heroes and heroines."

Continuing in his praise of officers killed in the line of duty, the President noted that "they devoted themselves to the timeless values that society shares. They valued the law. They valued peace .... They valued human life - so much that they were prepared to give their lives to protect it. They gave much and asked little. They deserve our remembrance. Here in America's capital, for as long as these walls stand, they will be remembered, not for the way they died, but for how they lived."

The dedication ceremony began with a procession in which 10,000 law enforcement personnel, police supporters, and survivors of fallen officers representing the 50 States, U.S. territories, and Federal agencies marched from the Capitol to the memorial site. Following the procession, over 160 individuals took part in a 24-hour "Roll Call of the Fallen Officers," wherein the names of the 12,561 officers were read nonstop at the memorial site. …

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