Women's Suffrage History Comes to Life McHenry County Officials Re-Enact Trial of Susan B. Anthony

By Balde, Lisa | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

Women's Suffrage History Comes to Life McHenry County Officials Re-Enact Trial of Susan B. Anthony


Balde, Lisa, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Lisa Balde Daily Herald Staff Writer

She just wanted to vote.

And no ambiguous law, or male jury, or unfair trial was going to stop Susan B. Anthony from making sure she had the right to do so.

Even though Anthony was found guilty in 1873 of illegally voting and charged a $100 fine, she went ahead and changed history anyway.

She declared the legal system, whose judge deemed Anthony guilty before she even stepped into the courtroom, to be corrupt. And she never paid the $100.

The rest, of course, is history.

On Sunday, 85 years after women received the constitutional right to vote, McHenry County paid homage to Anthony and all the work she did to make "rights" as important as they are today.

"In the courtroom, we're very concerned about rights," McHenry County Circuit Court Judge Michael Chmiel said Sunday. "History, I think, is very important, and oftentimes we forget about the history."

History was hardly forgotten Sunday, as Huntley's American Association of University Women presented its re-enactment of the United States vs. Susan B. Anthony.

A who's who of McHenry County officials stepped into the 1870s to recreate a trial that could've changed history, if Anthony hadn't been so set in her ways. …

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