Lisle Library Offers Book Clubs for Every Type of Reader

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 1, 2005 | Go to article overview

Lisle Library Offers Book Clubs for Every Type of Reader


A quick chat with a Lisle newsmaker

Lisle Library offers five book clubs that provide like-minded readers with opportunities to explore common interests and share their analysis of what they read.

Director of Adult Services Tatiana Weinstein coordinates the library's clubs.

She recently spoke with Daily Herald Correspondent Joan Broz to talk about the clubs and some of the challenges they face.

What book clubs does the library offer?

There is the Reader's Advisory book group and they read general and contemporary fiction and one or two classics. The Science Fiction/Fantasy book group reads science fiction and fantasy. The Murder Among Friends book group reads mysteries. The Great Books group reads strictly classics. Starting Sept. 17, we'll offer a Film Group club.

Tell us more about the Film Group.

This is an experimental club for us based on movies we own and have the rights to show publicly.

The first movie we'll show is "The Mummy" from 1932. Next month the film will be the newer version of "The Mummy" from 1999.

Our theme will be then and now. The club will meet Saturday afternoons and we'll let the group decide the direction they wish to take.

How do you define a book club?

Generally, it is a group of people who are all reading the same book or books on the same theme. You sit down, have refreshments and discuss the novel or theme. The theme can be the mystery group reading several authors that write mysteries in Canada.

There is a facilitator at each group to lead a discussion, but she does not quiz patrons.

What's a good size for a group?

Our largest group runs anywhere from eight to 20 people. Anyone is welcome to come to any meeting.

What advantage is there in belonging to a group?

A book club allows you to experience the book in another way. I found when I read a novel, I come to my own conclusions. …

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Lisle Library Offers Book Clubs for Every Type of Reader
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