268,435,456 Sonnet Anagrams

By Keith, Mike | Word Ways, August 2005 | Go to article overview

268,435,456 Sonnet Anagrams


Keith, Mike, Word Ways


Pick a line at random from the four in the first group, a line from the four in the second group, and so on, to create a Shakespearean sonnet with rhyme scheme abab cdcd efef gg. Repeat this process to create a second sonnet that is a line-by-line anagram of the first. There are some other mild constraints: the four lines in the second group mention the four seasons, and there are minor allusions to other poems. The lines were constructed to make each sonnet say something reasonably coherent (vaguely having to do with the current world situation).

1 Go, sinful worm, to heed the transient day; Enough were let to stand forth in dismay; Oh, it's not freedom ruins the tangled way; We find soon that the melodies turn gray;

2 Our flesh an empty mold, a Winter sigh. To play of idle art when Summer's nigh. Up, artist-men, go home when Fall is dry. Who fuel hate immortal Springs deny.

3 Now try and read this short life's resume, Hide so in terror, damn the stressful way, The rules of his mind's order went astray, Firm soldiers enter, shun the wars today,

4 Because men rose at once with plans so high. When each soon-passing truth becomes a lie. See towns through peace, man's chosen alibi. Ban laws, choose change, the promises untie.

5 So on this earth mature delights are sown; To dreaming souls the art hereat is shown: Some insights that our leader-haters own: Or measure this, what golden artists hone:

6 The countryside, a blue romantic sea, Your tuna slice, the basic modern tea, His secret cloud, a mountain by a tree, A land secure that you inscribe to me. …

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268,435,456 Sonnet Anagrams
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