Multicultralism: THE SATURDAY INTERVIEW: Culture and the Generations; Jo Ind Asked Three Generations of Three Diverse Families If They Had Close Friendships with People of Cultures Different from Their Own

The Birmingham Post (England), September 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Multicultralism: THE SATURDAY INTERVIEW: Culture and the Generations; Jo Ind Asked Three Generations of Three Diverse Families If They Had Close Friendships with People of Cultures Different from Their Own


Byline: Jo Ind

Babubhai Nathwani, aged 68, lives in Walsall with his wife and his son's family. He is a company director of Ace International, a sporting goods wholesalers. He is from a Ugandan Hindu background.

My family came to Uganda from India in 1924. We were economic migrants and we built up a printing and stationery business importing products from all over the world and selling to universities and colleges.

I had very good business relationships with people from Germany, Italy, Japan and the UK. English was the business language.

At home, we lived in an Indian neighbourhood and my closest friends were Indian.

We had to leave Uganda in 1972 because of Idi Amin. We couldn't take anything with us. My six bothers and their families came to England at the same time.

There was a slightly unwelcoming reception with people not wanting us to live on their street. We all came to live in Great Barr which I'd say was a 90 per cent white area.

We had to build a business up from scratch. It was very, very hard work. Our priority was to provide for our families and it wasn't easy.

Now we have a good mix friends, like our neighbours who are white, but when we first arrived we were trying to find Hindus from similar backgrounds - we are Lohanas - so we could have a platform for discussion and celebrate cultural events like Diwali together Vijay Nathwani, aged 44, is also a company director of Ace International. He is Babubhai's son and lives with the family in Walsall I was 11 years old when I came to England. I did my secondary school education in Birmingham and went to University in Scotland.

I had friends from Scotland, Ireland, England, India and the Middle East.

I had more English friends through sport or other interests such as music but I had more Hindu friends from activities with our community.

I'm active in maintaining all those relationships and the friendships that develop through business.

It's important for us to have friends with other Hindus and to maintain links with our culture but we are also good friends with the white and non-white people who live near us.

Our English neighbours have had the key to our house for 16 years, so there is no problem with trust and sharing basic values.

How would I feel if my son brought a white girlfriend home? Well I was the first one to do that, so I've already broken that taboo.

I think Rajiv is fortunate that my generation has worked hard to communicate our cultural values.

Also through our success and contribution to the economy, things have turned round so now it's very fashionable to be Indian Rajiv Nathwani, aged 17, is a full time student at King Edward's School, Aston. He lives in Walsall with his parents and grandparents I've got lots of good friends from different cultural backgrounds. The school I go to is 50 per cent nonwhite, which is quite unusual for a grammar school.

I also work in a store in the Bull Ring where most of the people are white. I go out with them, no problem.

At the school they are very positive about the non-white people and are aware of cultural differences, for example they have a Festival of Culture.

I think this really helps us to all mix well with each other. I think there would be more racial tensionif the school wasn't so aware. I'm the first Asian in our school to direct a musical and I'm deputy head boy.

My grandad has taught me about our culture and religion but I was interested anyway and wanted to know about it.

Hinduism is a religion that teaches you to embrace other religions as well. When I was younger I played Joseph in a nativity play. I've been in the choir and been to church which has given me insight into Christianity. I really believe in mixed schools.

I don't think my generation has to struggle with racism as much as my parents and grandparents. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Multicultralism: THE SATURDAY INTERVIEW: Culture and the Generations; Jo Ind Asked Three Generations of Three Diverse Families If They Had Close Friendships with People of Cultures Different from Their Own
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.