Car That Stops You Nodding off; Vibrating Steering Wheel Will Shake Drowsy Drivers Back to Attention

Daily Mail (London), September 6, 2005 | Go to article overview

Car That Stops You Nodding off; Vibrating Steering Wheel Will Shake Drowsy Drivers Back to Attention


Byline: FIONA MACRAE

AS motorists know, the boredom of a long car journey is enough to drive anyone to distraction.

After hours spent staring at a seemingly endless motorway, many have found themselves becoming less alert or even nodding off at the wheel.

Now scientists are developing 'intelligent cars' which can make our travels safer by reading our moods.

The vehicles are fitted with devices which capitalise on our sense of smell, touch and hearing to detect if we are sleepy, angry or stressed.

For example, cars of the future could be equipped with blink sensors to spot when a driver is becoming drowsy.

The sensors would be linked to built-in air fresheners which would fill the vehicle with the invigorating scent of peppermint the moment the driver appears sleepy.

And vibrating steering wheels - sensitive to changes in grip - could jerk drivers who are dropping off back to full alertness.

The sensors on the wheel could also detect the sweaty palms of a stressed-out driver and use the air fresheners to fill the car with the calming scent of lavender.

As well as devices to keep motorists awake, scientists are working on computer-generated horns and vibrating seatbelts, seats and pedals which could warn of potential accidents, giving the driver more time to brake.

Researcher Dr Charles Spence told the British Association Festival of Science in Dublin yesterday: 'It has been estimated that the average person spends ten per cent of their waking hours in the car and up to 50 per cent of car accidents are attributable to driver inattention. Hence, anything that can be done to improve the design of car warning signals so that they more effectively capture a driver's attention should help reduce the incidence of road traffic accidents. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Car That Stops You Nodding off; Vibrating Steering Wheel Will Shake Drowsy Drivers Back to Attention
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.