Distinguishing Tourists from Terrorists: Should Companies in Landmark Buildings Accommodate Amateur Photographers in an Era of Heightened Security?

By Gips, Michael A. | Security Management, September 2005 | Go to article overview

Distinguishing Tourists from Terrorists: Should Companies in Landmark Buildings Accommodate Amateur Photographers in an Era of Heightened Security?


Gips, Michael A., Security Management


SECURITY PROFESSIONALS at sensitive or high-profile sites clearly have a legitimate interest in determining who is photographing or videotaping their facilities. But online bulletin boards dedicated to photography have been abuzz with complaints by amateur photographers that they are being harassed by police or private security when they try to photograph certain private buildings from a public area. How does security balance the need for vigilance with respecting the rights of the public to take pictures from public property?

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The right to photograph the exterior of private buildings from a public place is protected by the First Amendment, say legal experts. So absent suspicious activity, photographers snapping photos should generally be left alone. That's the case at the Sears Tower, for example, says director of security Keith L. Kambic, CPP.

At that building, security personnel, off-duty police officers who double as doormen, are trained to learn what tourists and amateur photographers usually snap pictures of, such as the upper floors of the building or the sign identifying the building as the Sears Tower. The site is a popular tourist attraction, and building management does not want to alienate visitors, Kambic says.

Security takes note when photographers aim at less customary areas, however. "If someone is taking extensive photos of nontourist [subjects], like mechanical areas and air vents, that's going to raise a bit of caution with us right away," says Kambic.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

An officer might question the person if his or her activities seem suspicious. "We shy away from demanding that they stop," he explains. "If there's that much of a concern, we get the JTTF (Joint Terrorism Task Force) or the police involved."

This approach is markedly less aggressive than the behavior reported to have occurred at such sites as refineries and elsewhere. Bert P. Krages, II, an attorney in Portland, Oregon, who has an expertise in the rights of photographers, says he knows of more than 100 incidents in which photographers have been confronted by police or security for taking pictures of buildings from a public area. The concern is misplaced, he says.

"Why are people concerned about photography in the first place?" Krages wonders, pointing out that none of the major attacks in the last 20 years involved photography. "You're not going to get essential information for blowing up a building from a photo. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Distinguishing Tourists from Terrorists: Should Companies in Landmark Buildings Accommodate Amateur Photographers in an Era of Heightened Security?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.