Los Angeles Builds Alliance to Improve Race Relations

By Delchad, Lena | Nation's Cities Weekly, September 5, 2005 | Go to article overview

Los Angeles Builds Alliance to Improve Race Relations


Delchad, Lena, Nation's Cities Weekly


This article is part of a continuing series on racial justice and race relations in cities. Articles will appear weekly leading up to NLC's sixth-annual Race Equality Week, Sept. 26-30, 2005. The goal of the weeklong series of events is to raise the consciousness and awareness of the importance of the role of city officials in improving race relations, achieving racial justice and creating inclusive communities.

**********

The recent mayoral election in the City of Los Angeles drew international attention to the city's racial politics, long characterized by a rivalry over jobs, housing and schools. In a historic step, Antonio Villaraigosa became the first Latino mayor of Los Angeles in 125 years, and moreover, won the overwhelming support of the black community.

Villaraigosa's election is a milestone for the two communities that have a lengthy history of racial and ethnic tensions and fighting social injustice. Los Angeles' old political coalitions among white, Jewish, and black residents have broadened in a need to share power with a growing Latino population. Villaraigosa's victory was punctuated by majority support from Latinos, blacks, whites, the Jewish community, moderates, liberals and union members.

A microscope will be held to the new mayor's ability to keep the Latino and black communities working together.

On one hand Los Angeles has reason to celebrate the support built across party and cultural lines ushered in by the recent election. Blacks as well as Latinos were part of Villaraigosa's coalition, showing a cultural shift in ethnic symbolism and relationships.

On the other hand, persistent fights between black and Latino students in schools are just one indicator of continuing ethnic unrest.

Easing racial tensions was precisely the motivation behind unveiling a new coalition between African American and Latino Leaders, the "Latin And African American Leadership Alliance." The co-chairs of the alliance are the Rev. Al Sharpton, head of the New York-based National Action Network; Christine Chavez, granddaughter of labor hero Cesar Chavez and political director of United Farm Workers; and Najee Ali, a Los Angeles- and Chicago-based cleric and community activist. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Los Angeles Builds Alliance to Improve Race Relations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.