Best of Sellers

By Cobb, Robin | Marketing, December 10, 1992 | Go to article overview

Best of Sellers


Cobb, Robin, Marketing


As the SPCA Awards enters its second year, Robin Cobb reports on the cream of the promotions crop and overall winner Peaudouce

Appropriately enough, the flagship event of the Sales Promotion Consultants Association is a self-liquidator. Costs of its annual awards are met by entry fees for the competition and for participating in the presentation luncheon, held this year at the upmarket Institute of Directors.

Pride of the placings in the 1992 SPCA awards went to The Sales Machine for its high profile treatment of a below-the-belt product. The consultancy combined several promotional disciplines in the launch of Peaudouce's leak-free nappy.

The campaign was spearheaded by off-the-page direct response advertising, employing women's magazines and general national media. The offer was a premium package which included a free sample of the nappy, redeemable through both Freephone and Freepost.

With Peaudouce under pressure from Procter & Gamble's Pampers product and losing market share, the situation was transformed. There were 300,000 requests, representing 20% of mothers in the UK. The result was that Peaudouce's nappy sales more than tripled, doubling its brand share.

This won for The Sales Machine the awards for the best integrated sales promotion campaign and for the best promotional direct marketing campaign.

Another coveted award in an industry in which fresh ideas are its lifeblood, is that for the best promotional innovation. All other winners are selected by a judging panel, but this one is through the voting of SPCA members.

It turned out to be a close-run race and the winner was Courage's John Smith bitter promotion handled by ZGC. This was built around "See For Yourself" gamecards which featured a hidden message and a question about the product. To decipher the message, consumers viewed the gamecard through a pint. If they also answered the question correctly, they collected their prize--a free pint of John Smith's.

Research indicated that nearly three in five of the targeted drinkers were aware of the promotion and 7% tried John Smith's for the first time as a result. Initially the promotion was required for only 500 pubs and working men's clubs but was so successful that it was expanded into thousands.

"Our brief was to support the TV campaign and get people to look at the product," says ZGC director Eddie Hardy. "What we achieved was the most literal translation possible, with people actually staring into their pints. We played around with the colour balance of the gamecards so the message was visible through the fairly dark brown of John Smith's bitter but couldn't be read through lager."

Close behind was a coolly carved promotion for Bailey's Irish Cream by Marketing Principles, inviting consumers to try it poured over ice.

In this campaign, large blocks of ice were delivered to 80 selected restaurants, pubs and clubs, accompanied by a Bailey's iceman who sculpted the blocks into such temporary works as eagles, swans, fish and fruit baskets.

Simultaneously, vouchers were handed out for a trial glass of Bailey's-over ice. Altogether, some 20,000 measures of the liqueur were sampled in the exercise with 80% by people who had not previously tried the brand.

There were multiple awards for FCB Impact's work for MoDo, winning the section for the best use of art direction and gaining merit awards for copy-writing and photography. …

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