Psychologist Endorses Overnight Visits for Hinckley

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 20, 2005 | Go to article overview

Psychologist Endorses Overnight Visits for Hinckley


Byline: Arlo Wagner, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A psychologist yesterday testified that John W. Hinckley Jr.'s mental state has improved since he shot President Reagan and that the would-be assassin should be allowed to visit his parents and stay overnight with them in their home in Williamsburg.

"I believe with a reasonable degree of psychiatric certainty ... that Mr. Hinckley poses a low risk," Paul Montalbano said during daylong testimony in federal court.

Hinckley, 50, has been confined at St. Elizabeths Hospital since he was acquitted in 1982 of wounding Mr. Reagan and four others. He showed no emotion yesterday as his attorneys sought permission for him to progressively spend up to eight days and seven nights at his parents' home and sometimes with his brother, sister and in-laws.

Hearing on whether Hinckley should be allowed to visit his parents overnight will continue today in U.S. District Court.

Hinckley's parents have visited the District several times in the past year to accompany their son on unsupervised trips to parks, museums, shopping centers and restaurants. Routinely, he is allowed to wander about the 2,900-acre grounds of the mental hospital unsupervised.

Mr. Montalbano said Hinckley abides by rules and regulations. …

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