The Changing Face of America and Its Meaning for Elected Officials

By Thornton, Susan | Nation's Cities Weekly, September 12, 2005 | Go to article overview

The Changing Face of America and Its Meaning for Elected Officials


Thornton, Susan, Nation's Cities Weekly


The following is a preview of one of the topics to be covered during Leadership Training Institute seminars at the Congress of Cities in Charlotte, N.C. "The Changing Face of America: Visionary Leaders Engaging New Populations" will be take place on December 6.

America is changing, and changing fast. Forced from their homes by war, terrorism and poverty, and seeking a better life for their children, people from other countries are flocking to America's shores. Today, one in 10 Americans--nearly 30 million people--is foreignborn.

These recent immigrants are different from those who came in the past. Prior to 1965, most immigrants came from Europe; today's immigrants are coming from Asia, Africa and Latin America. The newcomers tend to be poorer, less educated and less likely to speak English.

About 10 percent of the newcomers are refugees, fleeing persecution in their homelands. Many of these have mental health needs from having experienced war, been tortured or raped or seen family members murdered.

Unlike previous generations of immigrants, today's newcomers don't leave the past behind. They travel back and forth to their native land, sending back hard-earned money.

An estimated five million or more are illegal, exacerbating tensions within the community.

In addition, large numbers of immigrants are moving to parts of the United States that have not traditionally hosted newcomers. Today's immigrants are moving south and west, following jobs in construction, meatpacking, agriculture and tourism.

Not only have the immigrants changed, but America has changed as well. Today's immigrants are encountering an "hourglass society," one with a growing gap between the rich and the poor.

Many immigrants find they are consigned to low-paying jobs, lack affordable housing and transportation options and receive minimal health care.

Newcomers are bringing challenges and change to many of America's cities and towns. But many elected leaders recognize that while immigrants bring challenges, they also bring an infusion of energy and enthusiasm, a richness of cultural tradition and values of caring for family and friends.

In addition, they bring a strong entrepreneurial spirit; for example, there are more than 1.2 million small Hispanic-owned businesses in the United States today, and their numbers are growing twice as fast as others. These are positives that many leaders are seeking to build upon.

Across the United States, elected officials are taking the lead to help immigrants make the transition to this new culture, put down roots and become contributing members of the community. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Changing Face of America and Its Meaning for Elected Officials
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.