While You're at the Magic Kingdom

Risk Management, April 1993 | Go to article overview

While You're at the Magic Kingdom


When strapped into the Space Mountain attraction at Walt Disney World Magic Kingdom Park, your car plummets down the track and zooms into blackness as meteors and stars explode all around yon. However, you can be sure that Walt Disney World Co. has done everything possible to ensure that your journey will be as safe as possible because The Walt Disney Co. has one of the most rigorous risk management programs in the United States. "We maintain high safety standards for all our operations," says Sue Rye, director of the loss control division at Walt Disney World Co., Lake Buena Vista, Ronda.

The Walt Disney Co. is a diversified entertainment company that includes not only Walt Disney World Co. in Florida, but also Disneyland Park in California, Disney stores worldwide, a motion picture studio, a cable television network and an array of other entertainment businesses. At many of the properties, loss control and claims activities are conducted by on-site personnel who report to senior executives at that facility. At Wait Disney World Co., for example, the loss control department consists of the prevention management division, including safety, environmental health and industrial hygiene departments, and the cost containment division, including the workers' compensation, the corporate insurance/administration and the guest claims departments.

"Members of the safety department serve as internal consultants to management in the creation of safety programs for Wait Disney World Co.," says Linda Smith, manager, corporate insurance/administration in the loss control division. "This includes ensuring all rides and attractions are constructed as safely as possible.

Safety features are built directly into the structure of the rides," she says. "For example, passengers on the Star Tours ride must have their safety belts on or the ride won't begin. …

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