American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 79, No. 2, Spring 2005

The Review of Metaphysics, September 2005 | Go to article overview

American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 79, No. 2, Spring 2005


Storytelling and Philosophy in Plato's "Republic," JACOB HOWLAND

Scholarly convention holds that in Plato's mind logos and muthos are fundamentally opposed, the former being the medium of philosophy and the latter of poetry. The author of this article argues that muthos in the broad sense of story or narrative in fact plays an indispensable philosophical role in the Republic. In particular, any account of the nature and power of justice and injustice must begin with powers of the soul that can come to light only through the telling and interpretation of stories. This is implicit in Glaucon's Gygean tale. Read in connection with the earlier tale of Gyges in Herodotus, Glaucon's muthos shows itself to be a story about storytelling and interpretation, knowledge of self and others, and the discovery of the roots of justice and injustice.

Catholic Cartesian Dualism: A Reply to Freddoso, CHRISTOPHER GILBERT

Alfred Freddoso has argued that Cartesian dualism cannot serve as the model for a philosophical anthropology that will be consistent with the plain sense of Church teachings. The author of this paper disagrees. Although the interpretation of Cartesian dualism to which Freddoso objects is not unwarranted by the Cartesian texts, a close reading of those texts suggests a different interpretation. This paper defends a reading of Cartesian dualism that departs from the one which Freddoso discusses. It is then demonstrated that this alternative reading is consonant with the teachings of the Church.

Malebranche's Occasionalism: A Strategic Reinterpretation, ALAN BAKER

The core thesis of Malebranche's doctrine of occasionalism is that God is the sole true cause, where a true cause is one that has the power to initiate change and for which the mind perceives a necessary connection between it and its effects. Malebranche gives two separate arguments for his core thesis, T, based on necessary connection and on divine power respectively. The standard view is that these two arguments are necessary to establish T. The author of this article argues for a reinterpretation of Malebranche's strategy, according to which the Necessary Connection Argument alone is sufficient to establish T. The Divine Power Argument, which is anyway weaker, is needed not to support T but to bridge the gap between T and full-fledged occasionalism. Specifically, it is needed to rule out the existence of causal powers in nature, a scenario which is consistent with T but inconsistent with occasionalism.

The Facticity of Being God-forsaken: The Young Heidegger and Luther's Theology of the Cross, SEAN J. MCGRATH

The early Freiburg lectures have shown us the degree to which Heidegger is influenced by Luther. In Being and Time, Heidegger designs a philosophy that can coexist with a radical Lutheran theology of revelation. Heidegger's hermeneutics of facticity constitutes a polemic with the Scholastic idea of a natural desire for God and an accommodation of a theology of revelation. However, Heidegger's implicit assent to the Lutheran concept of God-forsakenness is philosophically problematic. …

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American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 79, No. 2, Spring 2005
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