International Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 45, No. 3, September 2005

The Review of Metaphysics, September 2005 | Go to article overview

International Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 45, No. 3, September 2005


Modernity and Postmodernity: A False Dichotomy, AVERY FOUTS

This article is the third in a series. In the first, the author argues that existence is a property. In the second, based on the fact that existence is a property, he contends that Descartes's dream and malicious demon arguments are constituted by a fallacy with the result that he creates an illicit rift between thought and the external world that characterizes modernity. In this essay, it is shown that postmodernists overlook this fallacy and are forced to operate within the parameters set by it. Consequently, modernity and postmodernity form a false dichotomy with realism as the appropriate alternative. Descartes is taken as the representative of modernity and Caputo of postmodernity. The paper closes by showing that Caputo's intuition that the traditional notion of truth must be rejected in order to eliminate dogmatism stems from this false dichotomy.

Spinoza's Response to Maimonides: A Practical Strategy for Resolving the Tension between Reason and Revelation, STEVEN FRANKEL

Spinoza resolves the tension between reason and revelation by granting reason complete authority and autonomy in all philosophical and natural matters and by denying revelation any claims to knowledge. Despite this dramatic partisanship, he attempts to make this solution attractive to believers by creating a hermeneutic that allows a limited claim to knowledge for revelation. This article attempts to explain how he arrived at this strategy and why he believed it would succeed.

The Place of Reason in Advaita Vedanta, BINA GUPTA

It is commonly taken for granted that in Vedanta, as also in Indian philosophy in general, yukti, anumana, and tarka translate into "reason" (of Western thought) while oeruti is rendered as "revelation." The author of this article rejects this translation-interpretation; it is a good example of the way in which Sanskrit philosophical discourse is often misconstrued. The term oeruti does not refer to revelation, nor do yukti, anumana, or tarka to reason. Reason, the author argues, comprehends all the pramanas; these are all means of legitimizing beliefs. The paper distinguishes between different levels of the application of "reason," and it maintains that the mere reasoner (tarkika) has not grasped the true nature of "reason." In effect, it is maintained that oeabda, both lauika and alukika, is a component of reason, and so is perception. There is no concept of "revelation" in Indian philosophy, and no opposition between reason and experience.

The Rest of Cajetan's Analogy Theory: De Nominum Analogia, Chapters 4-11, JOSHUA P. HOCHSCHILD

The influence of Cajetan's De Nominum Analogia is due largely to its first three chapters, which introduce Cajetan's three modes of analogy: analogy of inequality, analogy of attribution, and analogy of proportionality. …

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International Philosophical Quarterly Vol. 45, No. 3, September 2005
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