Dist. 203: Textbooks Always Available for Review

By Jenco, Melissa | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 24, 2005 | Go to article overview

Dist. 203: Textbooks Always Available for Review


Jenco, Melissa, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Melissa Jenco Daily Herald Staff Writer

The flap over a biology textbook in Naperville Unit District 203 is raising questions about how such materials are chosen and the role community members can play in the selection.

The bottom line, school officials say, is parents always have a chance to critique textbooks before they reach the classroom, but few take the time to do so.

The books are put on display in Naperville's public libraries for at least 30 days, along with evaluation forms that can be returned to the district offices.

"In my six years in the district, I've only received one completed form and that was a positive response to the book," said Jodi Wirt, assistant superintendent for curriculum and staff development.

More people may look at the books, but if they don't fill out the evaluation forms, it's tough to say how many, she said.

The recent dispute began when school board member Jim Caulfield was looking at the book display and started flipping through "Biology: A Guide to the Natural World," by David Krogh, which is used in high school enriched biology classes.

Troubled by the book's detailed descriptions of contraceptive methods and what Caulfield considers unbalanced discussions of evolution and stem cell research, he asked the school board to consider replacing the book.

"I think we can do a lot better than this textbook," Caulfield said. "I think that taken together, it presents a number of ... issues for me and presents a pattern."

Although Caulfield was not a member at the time, the board was one of several groups to evaluate the book before it reached classrooms.

When the district develops a new high school curriculum, a committee of at least four teachers from each of the high schools and the department instructional coordinator from each school reviews the books.

Science teachers, for example, rate the books on how well they provide for inquiry-based instruction and on their scientific concepts. Then they make recommendations to the superintendent and school board. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dist. 203: Textbooks Always Available for Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.