Humanists vs. Christians; 'Battle for Truth' Will Seal America's Fate, Writer Warns

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

Humanists vs. Christians; 'Battle for Truth' Will Seal America's Fate, Writer Warns


Byline: Shepherd Pittman, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The fate of America hinges on who wins the worldview war - liberal humanists or conservative Christians, Brannon Howse argues in his new book, "One Nation Under Man?"

Mr. Howse is the founder and president of Worldview Weekend, a Christian conference, and is the education reporter and frequent guest host of the "Michael Reagan Show" on Radio America. The following are excerpts from a phone interview with Mr. Howse:

Question: Your book describes America as a nation divided along worldview lines. What are the two sides?

Answer: You have the secular left, the modern-day liberal. And then you have the other side, the traditional American - patriotic, God-fearing, faith, family and freedom.

It's really what the liberal media would refer to as the values voter. It's as though the people voting for [2004 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. John] Kerry didn't have values. They have values. Their values are abortion on demand, partial-birth abortion, same-sex "marriage," sex education at the earliest age. And their values showed up in how they voted. Bush supporters, by a margin of 2-to-1, attend church once a week. That's not true of people who voted for Kerry. So you can't say there isn't an obvious worldview war in America.

Q: What is the most important issue in that worldview war today?

A: If there's one thing we must do, it is teach our kids absolute truth. Our young people have overdosed on nonjudgmentalism. Many kids won't even say what Hitler did was wrong. There is a battle for truth. And the secular humanists hate truth. They hate it because they know what it is. Truth is a reflection of God's character and nature. If conservatives could do any one thing, we must instill into our kids and our culture that there is absolute truth. There is fixed morality for all people, at all times, in all places. The greatest thing conservatives can do today is proclaim truth and the source of truth.

Q: You call the separation of church and state "the liberals' big lie." What do you mean by that?

A: They claim that we have this separation of church and state, but you don't find that in the Constitution. You find it in the former Soviet Union's constitution. But not ours.

If the ACLU - which I call the American Communist Leftist Union - told Americans the truth about Thomas Jefferson, they couldn't hold him up as their poster boy anymore. He was a member of the religious right. When he was president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson was also on the school board of D.C. And he required that children learn to read by reading the Bible. As governor of Virginia and as the president, he called for national days of thanksgiving. Does that sound like a man who was interested in the ACLU idea of separation of church and state? So they've totally rewritten history to make Jefferson a liberal.

Q: Most secular humanists would probably say they were not religious, but you call secular humanism a religion. Why?

A: The Supreme Court ruled twice that the American Humanist Association is a religion. It has a religious tax-exempt status. A religion is simply a collection of beliefs, your ideas about God. Unless you're dead, you have a religion. I don't care who you are; if you're talking, you're breathing, you're living, you are living out your religion.

The liberals can't say they're not religious. …

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