Dan Savage

By Graham, Chad | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), September 27, 2005 | Go to article overview

Dan Savage


Graham, Chad, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


Seattle writer Dan Savage has penned the best book to date on why gays should be able to marry. The Commitment: Love, Sex, Marriage, and My Family (Dutton, $23.95) is, on the surface, the story of Savage and his partner, Terry, deciding whether to tie the knot. But the book also shreds the far right's bigoted arguments against marriage equality. More important, it's a funny, touching story of navigating family dynamics, with Dan, Terry, and young son D.J. each weighing in on the matter. In a perfect world, their story alone would open and change closed minds.

Why does the idea of marriage equality freak out Christian conservatives in this country?

They hate us. They really hate us. They are honestly fearful that if the world isn't a hostile place for gays and lesbians, their children who are gay will come out. This is all about Alan Keyes, for example, preferring Maya Keyes being closeted and miserable and "right with God" than Maya getting it into her head that she can live a full, ethical, open, and out life as a lesbian.

You take on Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum in this book. Any thoughts on his main spokesman's coming out as gay?

I don't think that Rick Santorum really believes the things that he says about gay people; otherwise, he couldn't have an openly gay staffer. If gay people are such a threat to his marriage, how is it that he can work so closely with a faggot all day long and go home to his wife and not have his relationship crumble? Either he doesn't believe it, or he's a stinking hypocrite.

I think a lot of [politicians are antigay] because it excites the grannies into writing the checks and voting their way. It's a cheap way for Americans to be morally right. It costs most Americans nothing to be antigay personally. It would cost a lot of Americans to be antipornography or anti-adultery or anti-premarital sex. …

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