Bus Brings Food Education to Schools

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), October 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Bus Brings Food Education to Schools


For 42 weeks a year the Cooking Bus has been touring schools teaching children to cook. Although this is predominantly an English initiative, the Cooking Bus made two stops in Wales this year, spending two weeks in Cardiff and Newport.

The Food Standards Agency Cooking Bus was launched three years ago as a three-year scheme to get healthy eating and food safety messages across to children.

Two teachers on the bus, which was developed in partnership with the Focus on Food campaign, work with school staff to inspire children and highlight the importance of food education.

The bus is one of three run by the Focus on Food campaign, which is now campaigning for a similar bus for Wales.

Roger Standen, a director of Focus on Food, said, 'We are looking to the Food Standards Agency Wales, the development agencies and the Welsh Assembly Government for funding.

'The whole idea behind the bus is, broadly speaking, that if children can learn to cook they can have more control over their diets - there should be an element of cooking in all schools.'

In the three years the mobile kitchen will be on the road, it will involve more than 18,000 pupils and 2,400 teachers, mainly in deprived areas, in its interactive cooking sessions.

The Cooking Bus provides hands-on workshops which given children the chance to cook dishes which can either be eaten on the bus or taken home. …

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