'Bromeliad Trilogy' Fun and Funny, Too

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 8, 2005 | Go to article overview

'Bromeliad Trilogy' Fun and Funny, Too


Byline: Julia DeCelles-Zwerneman, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

By Julia DeCelles-Zwerneman, age 11

Home-schooled, Falls Church

Imagine a sizable department store like Macy's or Hecht's. It looks pretty normal on the outside: It has glass windows that allow much light into the building and tall pillars that tower over the customers who amble by on their way to one of the many departments. If one looks just a little closer, though, one can see tiny, almost minuscule figures shooting around the humans' legs and shoes.

These are the Store gnomes, who live under the floorboards and in ratholes in Terry Pratchett's "The Bromeliad Trilogy."

These Store gnomes (called "nomes" in the book) call themselves by the departments in which they live, such as the Stationeri or the Millineri. They live in a department store named Arnold Brothers (est. 1905), although they think Arnold Brothers (est. 1905) is the name of some god who created the store for nomes.

Life in the store is good for the Store nomes: They have all the food they want, and they have a roof over their heads.

There are also Outside nomes, who come from outside the store. The Store nomes, thinking that there is no Outside, do not believe in them.

A small band of Outsiders, led by a young nome named Masklin, has just ridden into the store on a truck. They meet up with Angalo, whose father is a duke and who does not believe in the Outside; Dorcas, a nome who is crazy about mechanics; and Gurder, a nome who is from the Stationeri.

However, trouble is brewing for the Store nomes, and they can no longer live in peace. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Bromeliad Trilogy' Fun and Funny, Too
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.