Phil Morris PEST CONTROLLER: How to Be a Pest Controller; Public Sector, Sales & Marketing, Health, Education & Courses

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), October 10, 2005 | Go to article overview

Phil Morris PEST CONTROLLER: How to Be a Pest Controller; Public Sector, Sales & Marketing, Health, Education & Courses


PHIL Morris learned about pest control during his 14 years as a golf course greenkeeper. Moles, rabbits, bees' and wasps' nests, rats and mice all had to be dealt with on a daily basis.

Ten years ago he became a full-time pest controller. He had to learn about chemicals and gained certificates for the handling of poisons but most of the techniques he had already mastered.

Although he considers himself a rural pest controller he takes on industrial, commercial and domestic contracts.

His speciality is mole, rabbit and squirrel control and that keeps him busy during the winter.

His customers come from the whole of North Wales from Deeside to Colwyn and Llangollen and he has several contracts with golf clubs.

"The best bit of the job is that you are your own boss," said Phil, 44, who is based in Abergele. "And specialising in rural pest control means I am out in the countryside a lot of the time

What is the work like? Pest control technicians deal with a variety of pests that could be a danger to health or cause damage to property, crops and foodstuffs. They safeguard buildings against pests and vermin such as rats, mice, squirrels, rabbits, foxes, pigeons and insects.

The most common are rats, mice, wasps and insects, including black ants, cockroaches, fleas, earwigs and flies. Technicians visit homes, offices, factories, hotels, restaurants and when necessary sewers, warehouses and farms.

The job includes investigating the problem, identifying the cause and how the pests are gaining access.

Then they choose the most effective way of dealing with the problem while remembering health and safety factors. They decide on effective remedies such as laying traps, spraying nests, pumping powder into wall cavities. Then premises must be proofed against pests returning. Technicians also give customers advice on dealing with pests and they keep a record of their work on a computer. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Phil Morris PEST CONTROLLER: How to Be a Pest Controller; Public Sector, Sales & Marketing, Health, Education & Courses
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.