CBBC Stars Told to Mind Their Language; Governors Say Poor Grammar Is Creating Generation with Weak English Skills

Daily Mail (London), October 19, 2005 | Go to article overview

CBBC Stars Told to Mind Their Language; Governors Say Poor Grammar Is Creating Generation with Weak English Skills


Byline: ANIL DAWAR;MATT BORN

BBC bosses have warned children's programme makers about the deteriorating quality of language used by presenters, it emerged yesterday.

The corporation's governors say slang and poor grammar used by its stars are helping to create a generation with poor language skills.

BBC chairman Michael Grade summoned managers of the children's channel CBBC to question them over the concerns.

The digital channel, which also produces programmes for BBC1, features the controversial comedy show Dick and Dom in Da Bungalow and The Saturday Show.

Minutes of the governors' July meeting reveal that Alison Sharman, controller of CBBC, has promised to 'keep a close watch on the use of bad grammar so as not to undermine standards of English'.

She was responding to complaints-from teachers and academicsput forward at the meeting.

Earlier this year, retired teacher Joyce Watts complained about classroom problems caused by Saturday morning television programmes.

She told how impressionable youngsters watched presenters speaking 'loud and fast' and asking questions such as 'What d'ya like best?', 'What's ya faverit number?' and 'D'yer fancy 'im?' The 76-year-old singled out The Saturday Show - presented by Sophie McDonnell, Jake Humphrey and Simon Grant - and Dick and Dom in Da Bungalow for criticism. …

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