Success of Taiwanese Mothers in Guiding Adolescents

By Beckert, Troy; Strom, Robert et al. | Adolescence, Fall 2005 | Go to article overview

Success of Taiwanese Mothers in Guiding Adolescents


Beckert, Troy, Strom, Robert, Strom, Paris, Yang, Cheng-Ta, Shen, Yuh-Ling, Adolescence


Changes in family structure present technological societies throughout the world with unfamiliar challenges and opportunities for the care and development of children. There has been a rapid increase in the numbers of single-parent households, blended families, unmarried couples with children, gay and lesbian partners, and grandparents with responsibility for grandchildren when parents are unwilling or unable to fulfill their role (Population Reference Bureau, 2003). The diversity of these interactive constellations are often accompanied by unique stresses that make the obligation of parents, educators, and social agencies more complex as they try to support children in a broad variety of circumstances. The benefits and obstacles that characterize these situations are studied by researchers whose work sometimes results in shifts of public policy and interventions to improve family support (Leventhal & Brooks-Gunn, 2004).

Family cohesion, harmony, and healthy functioning are also implicated by other changes that attract less research attention. To illustrate, cross-cultural studies of families in Taiwan, Japan, and the United States (N = 5,386) have determined that differences in perceptions of parent and grandparent success are greater between generations than between cultures (Strom & Strom, 2002; Strom, Strom, Wang, et al., 1998). Accordingly, there is a great need to recognize that cohort populations may be more alike than are different age groups within the same nation or ethnicity. Appreciation of other cultures should expand to include an understanding of differences between generations within societies (Strom, Strom, Strom, Shen, & Beckert, 2004).

Generational differences in perception are motivating basic changes in Taiwanese family relationships. The custom has been that grandparents, parents, and children live together, guided by hierarchical governance based on gender and age. This practice is eroding because many young couples want their children brought up differently from the way they were raised. Therefore, parents are choosing to live apart from grandparents (Lee & Sun, 1995). This decision enables parents to feel less responsible for perpetuating some traditions, and minimizes interference from elders. The nuclear family presents parents with greater challenges for accountability and the need to respect the previously ignored views of children (Chen & Lester, 2002).

External sources have also motivated significant change in expectations of Taiwanese parents. Since 1997, the legislature has enacted a series of educational reforms intended to replace memory-dominated learning with creative thinking as the highest priority for classrooms (Lin, 1999; Republic of China Ministry of Education, 2001). Access to preschool and kindergarten is mandated, and legislation has placed parents on notice that their role includes becoming actively involved in helping to teach their children rather than assuming this task is reserved for teachers (Beckert, Strom, Strom, Yang, Huang, & Lin, 2004; Hwang, 2000). One aspect of these innovative reforms requires that schools provide continuous education for parents as their children advance from kindergarten through high school. The training of teachers is being revised to ensure that they understand how to collaborate with parents in adopting new methods for guiding children (Kuo, 2000; Sun-Lu, 2004).

The present study was conducted to help Taiwan schools implement the new policy of providing education for parents of adolescents. Parent classes are attended mostly by mothers, a practice that reflects the Asian tradition that they are the parent most responsible for child guidance and monitoring academic progress (Strom & Strom, 2002). Most Taiwanese mothers are employed and cannot be readily accessible to their children. Many try to compensate for their lack of time together by spending money on the children (Chen & Lester, 2002). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Success of Taiwanese Mothers in Guiding Adolescents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.