Twisting History; the Legacy of Jihad

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 21, 2005 | Go to article overview

Twisting History; the Legacy of Jihad


Byline: Diana West, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Big week for Uncle Sam. First, there was the referendum on the new Iraqi constitution, which, by the way, contains all provisions necessary for a sharia-ruled state. Then, at the president's by-now-annual Ramadan dinner, President Bush announced, "For the first time in our nation's history, we have added a Koran to the White House Library."

Anything wrong with this undoubtedly historic picture? Freedom marches on in Iraq, and tolerance expands its reach at home, or so they say. But I would put it this way: Democracy marches on in Iraq, and the Koran expands its reach at home.

Same thing? Not at all. But no one is supposed to consider the difference. So what if Article 2 in the Iraqi constitution states, "no law that contradicts the established provisions of Islam may be established." If people participate in an election for anything - including sharia, including Hamas - it's the Spirit of '76 all over again, or so our leaders say. Never mind that worried Iraqi Christians, concerned for religious freedom, say they're likely to ask Pope Benedict XVI to intervene. Meanwhile, according to the Bush Happy Face Doctrine, if any religious book goes onto the White House shelf, including one that's uniquely venomous toward "infidel" non-believers, it's a Hallelujah moment.

Is it just me, or does the president's gesture of inclusion sock the rest of us in the head? Fun-loving, peacenik Muslims aside, the Koran is indisputably the favorite book of Osama bin Laden, Abu Musab Zarqawi, the killers of Daniel Pearl, Hamas bus bombers, London Underground bombers and anyone who has ever hidden an IED on an Iraqi road to kill or maim an American soldier - none of which is the best recommendation for White House honors.

But maybe the president meant he would now be reading the Koran. He could start with Chapter 5, Verse 32, which he's taken to quoting as, well, chapter-and-verse evidence of Islam's aversion to bloodshed - always skipping the fatal exception. Mr. Bush will say: Killing an innocent human is like killing all of humanity, and then leave it at that. My translation of the Koran says: " ... whosoever kills a human being, except [as punishment] for murder or for spreading corruption in the land, it shall be like killing all humanity. …

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