An OBE but Golden Oldie Midge Is Still the Top of the Pops

Daily Mail (London), October 19, 2005 | Go to article overview

An OBE but Golden Oldie Midge Is Still the Top of the Pops


Byline: GORDON TAIT

HE was supposed to be the centre of attention as he picked up an OBE from the Queen for services to humanitarian work and music.

But yesterday, Midge Ure was upstaged by his stunning family as he happily posed for pictures outside Buckingham Palace.

The 52-year-old former Ultravox frontman and Live 8 organiser received the award from Her Majesty after dedicating more than 20 years of his life to charitable work, using music to raise money for victims of world poverty.

His wife Sheridan, 39, and four daughters Molly, 18, Kitty, 11, Ruby, eight, and six-year-old Flossie, were on hand to pose for a delightful family picture.

Mrs Ure looked radiant in a flowery ensemble while his three youngest daughters from his second marriage were keen to smile for the cameras.

His flame-haired daughter Molly, from his first marriage to actress Annabel Giles, also looked fantastic in a daring short black dress.

She has recently begun to follow in her father's footsteps by singing in a three-piece band called The Faders.

Ure said he felt 'fantastic' as he collected his OBE from the Queen. He donned a kilt for the special occasion but ditched traditional tartan in favour of a plain black version. …

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An OBE but Golden Oldie Midge Is Still the Top of the Pops
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