Alan Whicker

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), November 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Alan Whicker


Byline: By SALLY WILLIAMS Western Mail

The words 'suave' and'sophisticated' sum up the broadcaster Alan Whicker. The television series Whicker's World exposed the bizarre traits of some of the richest people on the planet by gently lifting their veil of privacy and blowing away their air of mystery.

The globetrotting former roving reporter, who once worked in Fleet Street, has been jetting off to far-off lands and interview- ing fascinating and some- times bizarre characters for 40 years.

The cast of Monty Python used a stock shot of a jet landing to introduce their version of Whicker's World.

When they landed on Whicker Island - a tropical island paradise - all the inhabitants had Alan Whicker suits, glasses and microphones because there were no more rich people left for him to interview.

A former judge on Miss World, Whicker still has a reputation as a charmer.

When asked what he would take to a desert island, he once replied, 'Two blondes, two brunettes and two redheads.'

He has been the nation's passive observer who has been welcomed at exclusive resorts, palaces and glamorous high-class cocktail parties from Asia to the United States.

He has given us a glimpse into life as a billionaire with John Paul Getty and into the luxurious lifestyle of the Sultan of Brunei.

And he has not been afraid to approach Paraguay's General Stroessner or Haiti's feared dictator Papa Doc Duvalier.

Whicker's World consistently made it into the top-10 ratings and Whicker has been showered with major awards.

Born in Cairo, Egypt, on August 2, 1925, Alan Donald Whicker attended Haberdashers' Aske's School in London.

He joined the British Army Film and Photo Unit in Italy in 1943. He served as a captain in Devonshire Regiment during World War II, filmed at Anzio, and met such influential figures as Bernard Montgomery. …

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