Robertson Redux: Pat's Provocative Patter

Church & State, October 2005 | Go to article overview

Robertson Redux: Pat's Provocative Patter


Television preacher Pat Robertson holds unique views on many issues. Over the years, he has shared these opinions through his "700 Club" program, in letters to supporters and in his books. Here is a sampling of some of his more provocative opinions:

No Such Thing As Church-State Separation

"I want to say very clearly, ladies and gentlemen, there's no such thing in the Constitution as, quote, separation of church and state. That term does not exist in the United States Constitution. It existed in the former Soviet Union's constitution, but not America."

--"700 Club," June 17, 1998

The Fruits Of Feminism

"The feminist agenda is not about equal rights for women. It is about a socialist, anti-family political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism, and become lesbians."

--anti-Equal Rights Amendment fund-raising letter, summer 1992

Gays Are Often Nazis

"[Homosexuality] is a pathology.

It is a sickness, and it needs to be treated.... Many of those people involved with Adolf Hitler were Satanists, many of them were homosexuals. The two things seem to go together."

--"700 Club," March 7, 1990

Religious Tolerance

"You say you're supposed to be nice to the Episcopalians and the Presbyterians and the Methodists and this, that and the other thing. Nonsense! I don't have to be nice to the spirit of the Antichrist. I can love the people who hold false opinions, but I don't have to be nice to them."

--"700 Club," Jan. 14, 1991

Conspiracy Theories

"Indeed, it may well be that men of goodwill like Woodrow Wilson, Jimmy Carter, and George Bush, who sincerely want a larger community of nations living at peace in our world, are in reality unknowingly and unwittingly carrying out the mission and mouthing the phrases of a tightly knit cabal whose goal is nothing less than a new order for the human race under the domination of Lucifer and his followers."

--The New World Order, p. 37, 1991

Rainbow Flags Will Spark Hurricanes

"This is not a message of hate; this is a message of redemption. But if a condition like this will bring about the destruction of your nation, if it'll bring about terrorist bombs; [if] it'll bring earthquakes, tornadoes and possibly a meteor, it isn't necessarily something we ought to open our arms to. And I would warn Orlando that you're right in the way of some serious hurricanes, and I don't think I'd be waving those flags in God's face if I were you. …

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