Web Sites Worth a Click

By Sosnowski, Carolyn J. | Information Outlook, October 2005 | Go to article overview

Web Sites Worth a Click


Sosnowski, Carolyn J., Information Outlook


MyPyramid.gov

www.mypyramid.gov

Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released a revised "food pyramid," which continues to serve as a nutritional guide for those interested in a healthy lifestyle. The new pyramid, based on the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, has an interactive and multifaceted Internet component. Users provide information about age, gender, and physical activity level, and the site makes recommendations for daily consumption from the five areas of the pyramid (grains, vegetables, fruits, milk, and meat and beans). Ideas for following the suggestions, in the form of "tips" and other resources, lead users to explore a diet rich in whole grains, deeply colored vegetables, and lower-fat foods. In a password-protected area of the site (where personal information is kept private), MyTracker allows users to plot and assess their diets and physical activity over time by entering food items (specific products and amounts) and exercise levels for analysis and comparison to the Guidelines. A helpful section for professionals offers teaching guides and a sample menu. At times, the site can be slow, but exploring MyPyramid is definitely worth the effort.

BookPage

www.bookpage.com

Subtitled "America's Book Review," this site contains reviews, interviews, and other tidbits for libraries, booksellers, readers, and publishers. BookPage is an extension of the print publication, which has been around since 1988 and is available at libraries and bookstores nationwide (a directory of locations is posted). Each month, more than 60 new items in a wide array of categories (mystery, romance, history, cookbooks, children's literature, autobiography, audiobooks, among others) appear on the site, either as part of the standard crop of reviews or representative of one of the month's themes (such as summer reading in July and women's history, gardening, and world travel in March). The Advice for Writers columnists answer questions and offer advice to authors looking for the straight story about getting published, finding an agent, and marketing their labor of love. Reviewer and interviewer credentials are listed with each piece, as are links to WorldCat, local bookshops, and an online bookseller price comparison tool. Searchable archives go back to 1996.

American Bar Association--Public Resources

www.abanet.org/public.html

This gateway leads consumers to the many free and informative resources on the American Bar Association Web site. …

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