Goliath: The Proof; Is This Inscription Evidence That the Ultimate Giantkilling Act Really Happened?

Daily Mail (London), November 12, 2005 | Go to article overview

Goliath: The Proof; Is This Inscription Evidence That the Ultimate Giantkilling Act Really Happened?


Byline: JULIE WHELDON

GENERATIONS have drawn inspiration from the story of David and Goliath.

Now archaeologists have made a discovery that lends credence to the Bible tale of how a shepherd boy armed with only a slingshot slew the feared giant.

While digging in what is thought to have been the giant's home city, they have uncovered a shard of pottery bearing an inscription remarkably similar to the name 'Goliath'.

The 21/2 long piece of pottery - thought to be from a 6-8 inch diameter bowl - dates from 950BC.

This puts it within 50 to 100 years of when biblical chronology claims David squared up to Goliath. It also makes it the oldest Philistine inscription ever found.

Excavation director Professor Aren Maeir, of the Bar-Ilan University in Israel, said the find does not provide definitive proof that the 9ft giant existed.

But it is the first clear evidence outside the Bible that the story may be more than a legend. It also supports the Bible's depiction of life at the time the battle was supposed to have occurred.

'What this means is that at the time there were people there named Goliath,' he said.

'It shows us that David and Goliath's story reflects the cultural reality of the time.' The pottery was found at Tel es-Safi, a dig site in southern Israel. This is thought to have been the location of the Philistine city of Gath - Goliath's home according to the Bible.

The Philistines are believed to have come to Israel in around 1200 BC bringing their own culture and language. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Goliath: The Proof; Is This Inscription Evidence That the Ultimate Giantkilling Act Really Happened?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.