Handheld Computers

By Pascopella, Angela | District Administration, November 2005 | Go to article overview

Handheld Computers


Pascopella, Angela, District Administration


Handheld computers, also called personal digital assistants, are making their way into more classrooms. In past years, handhelds were more commonly used among administrators to keep track of meetings, and by teachers to log student scores. But the handheld is now becoming more common as a classroom learning tool. Teachers are using them for math calculations, science projects use probes, and writing, and students are eating it all up, experts say.

Here are some books to help administrators show teachers how to use handhelds in class and actually create lessons around this technology:

How to Do Everything with Your Pocket PC

McGraw Hilt--Osborne $24.99

This book joins the company of the publisher's editions of Hou, to Do Everything with Your Palm Handheld, Fifth Edition, and How to Do Everything with Your Dell Axim Handheld. These books include black-and-white pictures of handhelds and screens, and everyday tips such as how to read books, write, save, edit and format documents, watch PowerPoint presentations, produce databases to store and query data, add handwriting, drawings and recordings to documents, and connect to desktops with infrared, Ethernet networking or modem.

Pocket PC for Dummies

John Wiley & Sons, $21.99

This book offers various tips and demonstrations, from what you can do with a pocket PC to reading eBooks, sharing photos with a digital camera, and understanding all the basic tools of the Pocket PC. It also has step-by-step instructions for entering information into pocket PCs, keeping an address book, keeping a mobile calendar, understanding synchronization and backing up PC files. …

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