The Crescent City and the Fiscal Black Hole: How a Phantom Golf Game Made a Ghost of Fiscal Responsibility

By Cavanaugh, Tim | Reason, December 2005 | Go to article overview

The Crescent City and the Fiscal Black Hole: How a Phantom Golf Game Made a Ghost of Fiscal Responsibility


Cavanaugh, Tim, Reason


True to the presidential tradition of overpromising and underdelivering, the most expensive round of golf in American history was never actually played.

Surely you remember the 18 holes President George W. Bush played while Hurricane Katrina was destroying the city of New Orleans? The one touted by, among others, radio host Randi Rhodes, National Magazine Award--winning columnist Gene Lyons, and a host of left-wing bloggers? The game that so shamed Bush he had to atone by flushing more than $200 billion into the toxic waters of the Delta?

It turns out there was no such round of golf. Hasty anti-Bush partisans were thrown by news that Bush had passed part of August 29 plumphag for his Medicare prescription drug benefit at Arizona's El Mirage RV and Golf Resort.

It's not clear why a golf game is more scandalous than an afternoon spent pleading with wrinkly old parasites to accept a $1.2 trillion handout from the government (it certainly would have been cheaper). But the story joined a group of handy mnemonics for the reasonable claim that Bush was out to lunch throughout the Katrina catastrophe (remember the photo of the president laboriously strumming a guitar the day after the mythical golf game?). The only way for Bush to assuage his embarrassment was to spend other people's money by the billion.

Thus, spectators of another exciting sport--the politics of largess--got to see the greatest game never played. In a Rooseveltian mid-September address from New Orleans' Jackson Square, Bush promised everything from immediate assistance to a "Gulf Opportunity Zone" to a virtual blank check for Louisiana officials fabled for their probity.

But there was a problem. Congressional Republicans, led by the maverick Rep. Mike Pence (R-Ind.), saw a chance to clear some governmental deadwood. Pence formed Operation Offset, a coalition aimed at making budget cuts to free up funding for disaster relief.

Under ordinary circumstances, Operation Offset would have been a 15-minute exercise in political theater, but some combination of the spiraling costs of the Iraq war, Bush's sputtering Katrina response, and memories of August's pork-laden highway bill had returned federal waste to center stage. …

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