Chaos Is Caused by Road Layouts

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), November 16, 2005 | Go to article overview

Chaos Is Caused by Road Layouts


I would like to elaborate on the comments in a Vent Your Spleen by a public transport worker about congestion charges.

I agree with him. We do have 18th Century traffic management systems in the UK. I can't understand what goes on inside the heads of traffic planners.

I drive all over the UK, averaging 1,000 miles a week. I wouldn't like to even guess how many speed bumps I drive over, all of which are totally unnecessary as they are all in 30mph zones anyway. We have too many mini-roundabouts, traffic lights are a mess, and traffic-calming zones do anything but calm you down. Look at the disastrous traffic management systems in Newcastle, in particular Scotswood Bridge, Scotswood Road and the B&Q roundabout, which has wrong lane markings, and the lights are a shambles too. Kingston Park is another nightmare, and now we have yet another mess on Rotary Way, the Gosforth Park A1 link, where the new McDonald's has recently opened. This road should have been dual carriageway.

Drivers are constantly slated for causing accidents. I say the traffic systems are to blame on many occasions ( so never mind charging us for the privilege of driving on bad roads.

ALAN PIPER, John Wesley Court, Prudhoe.

Appalled by block on drug

I FOUND myself horrified, disgusted and angered, reading your article on Stan Eaton (November 12). Stan is a mesothelioma sufferer who cannot get the chemotherapy drug Alimta on the NHS.

This man, through no fault of his own, has contracted a terminal condition in the normal pursuit of earning a living for himself and his family. After all those years paying into the National Insurance fund he is denied the drug that will ease his way through a seriously debilitating and painful ailment, unless he can get the employers who are liable for his condition to pay up and shoulder their responsibility.

The Northern Cancer Network said: "It is not cost-effective to be offered in North East hospitals." This drug is, however, available in Scotland and in Liverpool through the NHS. I seriously believe that the rest of the view of the Northern Cancer Network was left unsaid: for a person of this age. Stan is 69; would it be cost effective perhaps if he were 39? If this drug is available in Scotland on the NHS, then Stan is a victim of discrimination on nationality grounds. If it also available in Liverpool on the NHS, then Stan is the victim of discrimination on regional grounds. Add the discrimination on grounds of age, then Stan is a victim the socially-conscious voting population ought to be supporting wholeheartedly.

I lay down three challenges:

1. That Steven Byers, my own MP, rapidly gets together with every other MP whose constituency is covered by the Northern Cancer Network and demands action, in the strongest possible terms, to right this appalling injustice.

2. That every voting member of the region makes it clear to our Parliamentary representatives that failure on such an issue would constitute the strongest of grounds for them to place their vote, at the next election, elsewhere.

3. That the Northern Cancer Network takes speedy action to ensure Stan, and any others like him, get this treatment, now. They have the time available to them; Stan, unfortunately, does not.

This newspaper might also follow this issue with vigour and report regularly on just how well, or otherwise, our MPs succeed or fail. …

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