Merry Christmas

By Gilmour, Peter | U.S. Catholic, December 2005 | Go to article overview

Merry Christmas


Gilmour, Peter, U.S. Catholic


To the cardinals of the conclave who elected the new pope, and to Benedict XVI, merry Christmas. Remember the future, please.

Merry Christmas to George Lucas, whose omega Star Wars film, Revenge of the Sith, ends an era. You have not forgotten the future.

To all who will continue to benefit from Social Security, merry Christmas.

Merry Christmas to Dan Brown, author of the almost eternally popular The Da Vinci Code (Doubleday) and to all who have read this thriller. Enjoy the film.

To John Roberts, chief justice of the United States, merry Christmas. You and the pope are in for life.

Merry Christmas to the National Hockey League, whose teams returned to the ice and to their fans.

To all who remember Thomas Merton, now on the cutting room floor of the latest catechism, merry Christmas.

Merry Christmas to the New England Patriots, once again super at the Super Bowl last January.

Merry Christmas to Tom Reese, S.J., whose many years as editor of America magazine moved the church into the future.

To our deafly departed: Father Clarence Rivers, pioneering Vatican II American liturgical musician; Frenchman Jacques Dupuis, S.J., whose embrace of all religions was truly Christian; Dorothy Stang, S.N.D. de N. murdered in Brazil for God's creation; Wayne Teasdale, author of The Mystic Heart (New World Library); and Brother Roger Schutz of Taize, founder of the Taize Community, harbor for the persecuted, inspiration to young people, and witness for peace, merry Christmas. …

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