An End to the Boom?

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), November 20, 2005 | Go to article overview

An End to the Boom?


Byline: The Register-Guard

For 10 years, enrollment in Oregon's public universities has boomed in a way that hasn't been seen since the post-World War II generation entered college in the 1960s. This year, however, the Oregon University System reports that enrollment is nearly flat, and slow growth is projected for the next decade. The slowdown will relieve pressure on campuses that are at or near capacity, but the state's long-term interest depends on ensuring that more high-school graduates continue their educations.

The number of students attending the Oregon University System's seven schools climbed 30 percent between 1994 and 2004, with most of the growth coming in the last half of that decade. For 2005, however, preliminary figures show an enrollment increase of just 1 percent. The university system projects that enrollment will grow by only 14 percent by 2013. This year's enrollment is already short of those projections.

The growth has strained the capacity of Oregon campuses. The growth curve has been steepest at Portland State University, which had fewer than 16,000 students in 1994 and more than 24,000 today. Some PSU students attend classes in buildings long ago abandoned by the Portland School District.

At the University of Oregon, which has grown from just under 17,000 students in 1994 to more than 20,000 today, students are offered financial incentives to sign up for early morning or evening classes so that classrooms and lecture halls can be used more hours per day.

Among the many factors affecting enrollment, demographic factors are the most powerful. Higher-education enrollments in Oregon more than doubled during the 1960s, when the baby boom generation reached college age. The enrollment increase of the past decade is the echo of that boom, and it's about to pass. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An End to the Boom?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.