Six Men Whose Futures Would Be Changed

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), December 6, 2005 | Go to article overview

Six Men Whose Futures Would Be Changed


Bill Short, 74, was left desperately ill after being diagnosed with the asbestos-related lung cancer mesothelioma.

Doctors at North Tyneside Hospital advised he should receive Alimta.

But after discovering the drug was not available on the NHS, he launched legal proceedings against his primary care trust to get the treatment.

Widower Mr Short, of King's Road, Wallsend, lost his wife Rita aged 59 to breast cancer in 1989.

He believes he came into contact with asbestos while working at Blyth Power Station.

His daughter Susan Reay said: "We are 100% behind the Chronicle's campaign."

Arthur Tiffin, 52, from Walbottle in Newcastle, has only months to live after being struck down by lung cancer mesothelioma.

He trained as a pipefitter with a Jesmond engineering firm and then worked with asbestos all his life.

He now faces paying pounds 24,000 to receive the drug at the Nuffield Hospital.

But he is fighting to get it for free before his son is married in February.

Arthur said paying for the drug means losing his live savings, which he had hoped would keep his wife Cora and two children safe after his death.

He said that he will fight until his death to make the drug available for North East sufferers.

David Gavin, 54, of Felling in Gateshead, worked in shipyards on Tyneside all his life.

He was diagnosed with mesothelioma in August and at the time he was told he had only six months left to live.

He has now been forced to move to Liverpool to receive the drug on the NHS.

He is living with his sister and has had two treatments with the drug.

He is now able to walk further than he could two months ago and says he feels great. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Six Men Whose Futures Would Be Changed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.