Light Up Their Faces

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), December 6, 2005 | Go to article overview

Light Up Their Faces


Buying pressies for the youngsters in your life can be hard work.

And while toys and chocolates usually go down well, you might prefer to give them something with longer-lasting appeal, which won't rot their teeth and won't drive you up the wall ( like the hotly tipped Crazy Frog ringtone character doll.

So here's our guide to presents that will light up the faces of little girls and boys.

Pocket money ( pounds 10 and under

Kids of any age will like these zany Zanimals mousemats, pounds 3, from Paperchase (0161 839 1500 for mail order). Choose from two colourful designs ( a cat dressed in a stylish spotted jumper, or a psychedelic pattern of all the Zanimals.

Keep them occupied on journeys and trips with these magnetic games, pounds 6 each from John Lewis. There are five to choose from, including Hangman, Backgammon, Checkers, Four-In-A-Row and Snakes & Ladders.

Little girls will find the Enchanted Kingdom tea set, pounds 7.99 from Superdrug, a real delight. With enough tea cups and saucers for four special guests, it also includes a small teapot and a sugar jar.

Boys will have hours of fun with Playskool's Star Wars Darth Tater, pounds 9.99 at Woolworths. The dark side of Mr Potato comes with lightsabre, cape, helmet, shoes, eyes, nose, teeth, and more. A Sith Lord could only hope to look so good!

Piggy bank ( pounds 20 and under

The Christmas story of Raymond Briggs' The Snowman is much-loved, and parents and children alike will like the Snowman snowglobe, pounds 12 at Boots. With little green stars surrounding the Snowman when it's shaken, it's ideal for girls and boys.

The new Tamagotchi are going to be a sure-fire hit. Crack open your egg to discover if your virtual pet is a girl or a boy, then take care of them. …

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