North Carolina Central University to Establish Institute for Homeland Security

Diverse Issues in Higher Education, November 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

North Carolina Central University to Establish Institute for Homeland Security


DURHAM, N.C.

North Carolina Central University announced in October that it will establish an Institute for Homeland Security & Workforce Development to better educate students and the local community about issues related to terrorism and emergency management.

"The institute will be the nucleus for a new academic emphasis in homeland security and will complement the existing academic program in the department of criminal justice," says Chancellor James H. Ammons. "With the increased threat of terrorism, we believe that we will help the state of North Carolina create a workforce that is highly educated about security issues to better protect our citizens and the nation."

Beginning spring 2006, classes, seminars, workshops and forums will be conducted by the institute in collaboration with local, state and federal agencies as well as other university departments, to train North Carolina practitioners and students in terrorism risk assessment, investigations and emergency management.

Increased internship opportunities for students are an added benefit of an institute designed to give students training with a "hands-on" approach to skill acquirement.

Several former and current executives from key federal and state law enforcement and emergency management organizations met at NCCU last month to discuss workforce needs, public safety and emerging state, national and international issues regarding security.

"It is this kind of knowledge and expertise from a 'brain trust' of proven experts and professionals that the institute will be able to make available to benefit the citizens of North Carolina," says Robert M. …

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