Statement by Leslie Burger, Candidate for ALA President

American Libraries, March 2005 | Go to article overview

Statement by Leslie Burger, Candidate for ALA President


I accepted the nomination for the ALA presidency because I believe that I can provide the dynamic leadership to transform libraries into the well-funded, highly valued resources that Americans deserve and desire. By working together and speaking with a unified voice, we can galvanize public opinion so no individuals or communities are left behind in the information age. Today, we face slashed budgets as well as closed libraries. We must act quickly and decisively not only to stop the loss of access but also to bring to our constituents tomorrow's libraries today.

I live by the philosophy "If you can dream it, you can do it." We are only limited in our ability to get things done by the boundaries of our imagination. At the Princeton (N.J.) Public Library, I applied skills gained as an active participant in ALA, consultant, and division and chapter president to demonstrate how leadership can transform libraries. Within a year of coming to Princeton, I mobilized public support and raised sufficient funds to build a new library that captured the heart and soul of our community. Similar results in libraries where I have worked or served as a consultant prove that good leadership can turn around public, school, and academic libraries throughout the nation.

As ALA president, I will apply my successful leadership experience to stretch the Association's boundaries well beyond its current limits, helping members demonstrate the power and value of libraries to transform lives within their communities.

Setting a policy agenda

I will work to ensure that ALA is the leading voice in formulating policies that affect libraries and librarians. We must build a proactive legislative agenda that reframes the debate to promote the public interest and advance our shared vision for the next generation of library users. We must stand for equitable, free, and open access by countering attempts to undermine this in the public arena. Our powerful stance on issues to protect access to government information, free expression, and privacy must set the tone for our positions on similar issues. I will ensure that ALA remains vigilant in monitoring attempts to abridge our intellectual freedom and civil liberties and make sure that all members have the tools they need to defend such attacks at the local level. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Statement by Leslie Burger, Candidate for ALA President
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.