Meet Your Colleagues in Nashville for "The Great Debate." (Aug 1993 American Correctional Association's Congress of Correction at Nashville, Tennessee) (Nashville)

Corrections Today, April 1993 | Go to article overview

Meet Your Colleagues in Nashville for "The Great Debate." (Aug 1993 American Correctional Association's Congress of Correction at Nashville, Tennessee) (Nashville)


Nashville, Tenn., home of the Grand Ole Opry, is the perfect setting for the American Correctional Association's 123rd Congress of Correction. From Aug. 1-5, corrections professionals will discuss the issues of "The Great Debate: Should the Sanction Fit the Crime?" in one of the nation's most exciting cities. Talk about mixing business with pleasure--you'll enjoy a first-class event at 1992 Congress prices.

A variety of topics will be explored in a well-rounded program designed to meet the needs of today's corrections professional. More than 70 workshops and seminars will be held to enlighten practitioners about the latest developments in the field. This includes three special seminars sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections, three seminars presented by ACA's Professional Education Council and a Standards and Accreditation Seminar sponsored by ACA.

Earn Continuing Education Units

Attendees at the 123rd Congress will also have an opportunity to earn one full continuing education unit (CEU) from ACA and Eastern Kentucky University by registering for this program and attending 10 hours of Congress program events. Participants will receive a certificate indicating successful completion of the program after the conference.

How to Register for CEUs:

* Check in at the ACA registration area, on site, prior to Monday's Congress activities--the cost in advance is $25 in addition to your registration fee (on-site registration fee is $30).

* The CEU program card you receive should be completed and appropriately signed for each session.

* The completed card should be received by the ACA on site, or by mail at the ACA office no later than September 24, 1993 to receive your certificate.

CEUs can be obtained in one of 11 different subject areas based on major session tracks A-K as outlined below:

* Choose one major session track to attend along with its four corresponding supporting sessions (i.e. major session A and supporting sessions A-1, A-2, A-3 and A-4).

* Have your program card signed by the session evaluator at the close of each of the sessions.

* Attend two additional sessions from the following list: Opening Session, General Session, Closing Plenary Session, Professional Education Seminars, NIC Special Intensive Skills Training Workshops, and other major sessions.

Only those sessions that do not conflict with your major and supporting session requirements can apply.

Although CEUs do not carry credit toward a degree, they do meet established criteria for increasing knowledge and competencies. A nationally recognized method of recording participation in continuing education, CEUs are regarded by employers as a symbol of professional achievement.

Attend Informative Workshops

Supporting sessions, to go along with 11 of the 12 major tracks, were selected at the annual Program Council meeting held during the Winter Conference. The workshops were submitted by ACA's chapters, affiliates, committees, councils and task forces, who worked diligently to prepare excellent proposals.

Below is a list of the 12 major tracks. Further information on the Congress program will be provided in the June issue of Corrections Today.

A. Sentencing Options for Juveniles Coordinator: Rose W. Washington, Member, ACA Board of Governors, and Commissioner, New York City Department of Juvenile Justice, New York, New York

B. Leadership--Coping With a Changing Workplace Coordinator: James "Andy" Collins, Director, Institutional Division, Department of Criminal Justice, Huntsville, Texas

C: Information, Education, and Communication: Defining Ourselves and Leading the Way Coordinator: Joyce B. Jackson, Public Relations Officer, Department of Corrections, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

D. …

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