I'm Charles Dickens' Great Great Grandson!

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), December 15, 2005 | Go to article overview

I'm Charles Dickens' Great Great Grandson!


Byline: By LISA JONES South Wales Echo

IT is the best of times: to find the great-great-grandson of Charles Dickens alive and well in South Wales. At a time of year when everyone remembers the famous 19th-Century authorAEs A Christmas Carol, a Caerphilly church has gone one better. They have found a direct descendant of the writer living and working in their midst. Raymond Charles Dickens, who lives in the Vale of Glamorgan and works in Caerphilly, will now be reading his ancestorAEs tale of Ebenezer Scrooge at a Christmas carol concert. Mr Dickens junior, whose late father was also named Charles, moved to Wales in 1978 from Kent and is a director at insurance brokers Thomas, Carroll based in Caerphilly. And heAEs his great great-grandadAEs number one fan.

He said of his family ancestry: oFor quite some time I have been collecting all things connected with my great great-grandfather oI have a bust of Charles Dickens which is the spitting image of my late father. oI am also very fond of a painting by RW Buss called DickensAE Dream, which shows Charles relaxing in an old chair, with his legs crossed, and all the characters from his novels surrounding him.o oI find his work honest. He told it how it was. He brought the common man into life. oBack then, characters in fiction were often subservient. I feel Dickens changed all this.o RayAEs favourite Dickens quote is from A Tale of Two Cities, when Sidney Carton says: oIt is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.o Raymond also maintains his familyAEs artistic leanings. In his spare time, he manages a funk rock group from Llanishen, Cardiff, called Magic Medicine, composes his own music, and is writing a book about his fatherAEs life.

John Moore, managing director of Thomas, Carroll said: oFor people throughout the world, A Christmas Carol is the embodiment of Christmas, both how we celebrate it and for its spiritual and humanitarian meaning. …

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