Throw out Religious Stereotypes

By Dickie, Lance W. | The Masthead, Winter 2005 | Go to article overview

Throw out Religious Stereotypes


Dickie, Lance W., The Masthead


As demographic shifts reshape America's religious and political landscape, it is hazardous for opinion writers to cling to partisan stereotypes on faith alone.

Such was the cautionary note at the heart of the breakout session moderated by E.J. Dionne, Washington Post syndicated columnist.

Moral passion rooted in faith is not limited to conservatives, Dionne said in introductory remarks that recalled the religiosity of Senator Joe Lieberman's Democratic pursuit of the vice presidency. "Holy Joe" campaigned in 2000 on the legitimacy of bringing religion into the political arena, Dionne said.

Changes in public attitudes and political discourse are as likely to swing a discussion from whether a candidate is too religious, to the notion that a candidate is not religious enough.

Consider the demographic revolution that makes forty-one million Latinos the largest minority in twenty-three states. The Latino electorate is twice the size of Asian-American and Jewish electorates, and second only to that of African-Americans.

Latinos are ninety-three percent Christian, with a steady seventy percent Catholic and twenty-three percent Protestant, the latter number larger than all the Jews, Muslims, Episcopalians, and Presbyterians in the United States.

Republicans imagine reaping votes among Latinos who tend to be morally and ethically conservative. Democrats might point to Latinos, who tend to be politically and economically liberal.

Instead, the trends defy traditional assumptions, according to Gaston Espinosa, assistant professor of philosophy and religious studies at Claremont McKenna College.

Latinos, who are forty percent of the membership of the Catholic Church in America, are transforming it. Yet Espinosa's research found steep membership declines among second and third generations. Latino Catholic identification is kept steady at seventy percent by immigration. Despite the Latino presence on church registers, only five percent of parish priests are Latino. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Throw out Religious Stereotypes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.