Flamboyant Behavior OK with Gays?

By Milano, Philip | The Florida Times Union, December 6, 2005 | Go to article overview

Flamboyant Behavior OK with Gays?


Milano, Philip, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Philip Milano

Question

I was playing sports against this gay guy who was extremely, flamboyantly campy. I was quite turned off. How do you homosexual guys feel about this kind of off-the-chart display?

Joe W., straight,

Vancouver, British Columbia

Replies

People who go out of their way to be over the top bother me. This kind of behavior might be fine among friends but is out of place at a sporting event, just as a belching, drunk, beer-bellied football fan would be at a church service.

Jay, 31, gay, Huntsville, Ala.

I know an "in-your-face" gay man. He wants to offend people because he views their reaction as some sort of asinine "litmus test" -- if they don't say anything, they're "closeted gay-bashing hypocrites," and if they do, they're "homophobic gay-bashing rednecks." You can't win for losing with this jerk.

Ann, 38, straight,

Kansas City, Mo.

I applaud the flamers because they never saw the need to hide who they are. It gave me the courage to come out.

Jeremy, 31, gay,

Huntington, W.Va.

It takes all kinds to make up this old world.

Dwanny, 51, lesbian,

Fort Worth, Texas

I don't mind fem when it's coming from a friend because it's funny, but when I really sit down and think about it, these are the types of guys available to date -- and they don't want to be like guys! I like men for a reason: because they are men!

George, 24, gay, San Antonio

Expert says

We'd talked about gay issues with Warren J. Blumenfeld for the book I Can't Believe You Asked That! (Perigee). He is the author of Homophobia: How We All Pay the Price (Beacon Press) and a top expert on gay culture. …

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Flamboyant Behavior OK with Gays?
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