National Accreditation Standards Impact Teacher Preparation

By Thomas, LaJeane G.; Taylor, Harriet G. et al. | T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), June 1993 | Go to article overview

National Accreditation Standards Impact Teacher Preparation


Thomas, LaJeane G., Taylor, Harriet G., Knezek, Donald G., T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)


In 1990, the International Society for Technology (ISTE) affiliated with the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). NCATE is the only body officially sanctioned by the U.S. Department of Education to accredit schools of education. ISTE has developed guidelines for programs in computer education and technology specialty areas that have been approved by NCATE for use in evaluating professional education units.[1]

ISTE's association with NCATE has already resulted in a significant impact on the way computer and technology education is viewed in the United States. Educators are now reporting instances where the combined power of the ISTE standards and NCATE recognition have contributed to successful efforts to develop programs and promote change within the educational structure.

In this article, the NCATE accreditation process is explored, case studies of successes linked to these standards are presented, and future efforts are identified.

* NCATE's Role

NCATE provides standards for the evaluation of professional education units (entire colleges or education departments) to determine the overall quality of all teacher preparation programs within the institution. In addition, NCATE relies on "learned societies," to develop standards for specialty areas within the professional unit.

Institutions seeking NCATE accreditation must document overall quality and must further prepare specialty-area folios that address standards developed by the affiliated societies and approved by NCATE. Accreditation is given for the entire professional unit and not separate programs within the unit. Individuals cannot submit a specialty program to NCATE unless the entire unit is seeking accreditation.

* ISTE Guidelines for Ed. Tech.

ISTE has developed guidelines for four programs within the educational computing and technology specialty area:

* Basic Computer/Technology Literacy Endorsement Programs, for teachers of computer literacy or applications courses;

* Advanced Educational Computing and Technology Master's Program, for computer coordinators with emphasis on leadership roles;

* Secondary Computer Science Education Endorsement Program, for teachers who will add computer science as an additional teaching field to an existing credential; and

* Secondary Computer Science Education Bachelor's Degree Program, for teachers seeking primary certification in computer science.

* The first two programs were approved by NCATE in September, 1991.[2,3] The last two were adopted in October of 1992.[4]

At the core of the ISTE programs is a set of foundation skills for all teachers.[5] These skills are fundamental and must also be addressed by those submitting programs within the ISTE specialty areas. While not imposed on the unit-at-large or other specialties, the skills do represent sound, research-based fundamentals reflecting the level of preparation needed for all teachers to function effectively in the technology-enriched schools of the future. Models for the global community, the skills have quickly been recognized as "de facto" standards by educational leaders worldwide.

* Benefits of Formal Status

Through recognition by NCATE, an organization acknowledged as the leader in teacher-preparation standards and policy, ISTE has formalized the discipline of educational computing and technology within the field of education. Far-reaching implications include:

* Formal Disciplines Defined - Disciplines such as educational computing and computer science education are defined and distinguished formally within the NCATE framework.

* Mark of Professionalism - The quality control of accreditation is a part of most professions. These standards provide much-needed professional status recognition to many individuals and programs.

* Curriculum/Program Enhancements - Curriculum guidelines are used to evaluate existing teacher preparation programs, to promote changes and enhancements in programs, and to encourage development of new programs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

National Accreditation Standards Impact Teacher Preparation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.