Political Correctness 'Denying the Truth'

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), January 3, 2006 | Go to article overview

Political Correctness 'Denying the Truth'


Byline: BY DAVID BARRETT Daily Post Correspondent

A BOOK published by right-wing social policy think-tank Civitas blamed politically correct attitudes for creating "Muslim ghettoes" which produced "young men who commit mass murder against their fellow citizens".

Author Anthony Browne said political correctness had become a form of "soft totalitarianism" which had led to "moral cowardice" and "intellectual dishonesty".

"The politically correct truth is publicly proclaimed correct by politicians, celebrities and the BBC even if it is wrong, while the factually correct truth is publicly condemned as wrong even when it is right," said Mr Browne.

PC has gained a "vice-like grip over public debate" and, although it once had a purpose in preventing overt discrimination it now "causes more harm than good", he argued.

"Intolerant and sanctimonious" political correctness had led to censorship, he said.

Some views were being suppressed not because they were likely to cause physical violence or threaten national security, but simply because they caused offence or aroused emotions such as hatred, he said.

Anyone who challenged PC views was "deemed a viable target for any personal abuse".

By always backing the perceived "victim" against the so-called "oppressor", and by relying on an argument's emotional appeal rather than the facts, PC had made some arguments almost impossible to refute, he said.

For example, adherents of PC routinely blamed the explosion in the UK's HIV infection rate on teenagers having unsafe sex.

But the "factually correct truth" was that the rise was largely down to the arrival of HIV positive African immigrants in Britain, a fact now openly reported by the Public Health Laboratory Service, he added. …

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