Serving Up Success: In a Partnership with Frisch's Restaurants, Inc., a Food Service Program at an Ohio Career Center Is Helping Students with Learning Disabilities Transition from School to Work

By Powell, Joanne M. | Techniques, January 2006 | Go to article overview

Serving Up Success: In a Partnership with Frisch's Restaurants, Inc., a Food Service Program at an Ohio Career Center Is Helping Students with Learning Disabilities Transition from School to Work


Powell, Joanne M., Techniques


The Greene County Career Center in Xenia, Ohio, has a food service program satisfying the appetites of visitors, students and staff, as well as meeting the training goals of students with developmental disabilities. In 1991, the food service program formed a successful partnership with Frisch's, a Cincinnati-based restaurant chain. The career center is just one of the many career-tech schools participating in Frisch's restaurant training program.

In 1990, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) mandated formal transition planning for all students receiving special education services. Career and technical education became actively involved in assisting students with disabilities in education, job training and employment.

Frisch's, established in 1939, has a history of recruiting individuals with special needs, according to Michael Gilligan, recruiter for the chain.

"If people with disabilities need jobs, and we can provide jobs, and we can customize to the person working around his or her disabilities, it makes good business sense," Gilligan says.

With this in mind, Frisch's restaurant training program was cited in an issue of Restaurants and Institutions as a model of how businesses can form partnerships with state rehabilitation agencies to increase the success rate of hiring those with disabilities. The success of this program has gained national attention for Frisch's.

The restaurant training program offers students with special needs the opportunity to train for careers in the restaurant industry, while helping to solve two of the biggest problems facing the vast restaurant business--the critical labor shortage and the high cost of training--while also placing those with disabilities in the workplace and off the Social Security system.

Opportunities for All

Recent changes have opened the Greene County Career Center's program to participation by any student interested in food service. Although the program is open to the entire student population, the aim of the program is toward students with disabilities. The participants have always, and continue to be, those on an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Their disabilities vary from physical to mental to emotional.

Before a student enters this program, a comprehensive vocational test is completed to determine his or her interest and skill area. Through the IEP process, interested students from any of the seven Greene County school districts determine their career goals and then may choose to enter into the food service program. Students enter the program in their sophomore year and may stay in the program for two to five years (or up to age 22), depending on their individual needs.

Students not only receive career skills in food service, but also applied academics and related and employability skills. If students successfully complete all required coursework and career training, they receive their passports containing their skills achieved, grades, attendance, career goals, vocational trade certificate and high school diploma.

Frisch's at the Greene County Career Center has continued to grow in popularity since its startup in 1991 under the previous instructor, Betty Hosta. Today, the food service program continues to be a successful operation under the present instructor, Joanne Powell. A limited Frisch's menu is served with a smile and at very reasonable prices. The program operates on Tuesdays and Thursdays during lunchtime, 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Food was originally purchased on a to-go basis or served restaurant style in the school's Greene Room. Instructors would bring their classes to Frisch's with advanced reservations, with the community also welcome to enjoy this Frisch's experience.

The Diner

As of spring 2004, the food service class moved into a new classroom and lab facility. The new facility includes an eating area modeled after a fast-food restaurant known as The Diner. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Serving Up Success: In a Partnership with Frisch's Restaurants, Inc., a Food Service Program at an Ohio Career Center Is Helping Students with Learning Disabilities Transition from School to Work
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.